Flapmmo

Earlier in the year the world thought it was at peak Flappy Bird, but once the developer pulled it from the app stores, many versions were created in attempt to recreate its popularity. One of the more notable versions that appeared online is flapmmo.com. This site allows users to compete with each other in almost real time.  Since flapmmo.com was launched, the game saw both a surge of popularity and well as undergoing a number of iterations. Extra servers were added, the graphics were heightened and it became more aesthetically pleasing with statistics added to gameplay. The statistics that have been introduced show the percentage of deaths at each pipe and users are able to see where fellow gamers are failing. Canadian software developer Connor Sauve made the observation that the game started the track the number of flaps made by each user. For people that play this game, this means they are now able to view recordings of previous attempts made by other users rather than the exact movements of gamers playing at the same time. In an attempt to analyse trends in the game, Sauve left the game open for a local server to log the attempts made by other users and ended up logging up 419,000 game attempts thus giving him plenty of data to analyse.

The most interesting trends that could be taken from the data include:

1. Some people are just really addicted- Sauve noted that one user made nearly 200 attempts but could only stay alive for less than 200 seconds

2. The further you get the harder it becomes- this is a surprise as the game doesn’t get more difficult, more stress is just placed on the gamer.

3. People get better with practise

Image

Picture source: http://mashable.com/2014/03/15/mob-control-games/

In conjunction with Bruns (2007) key characteristics of produsage, the idea of “unfinished” factors into the original Flappy Bird app. Due to its iterative nature, as the app is fairly basic, it has produced an evolutionary product and thus different formats have been created such as Flapmmo.com.

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2014/mar/03/flappy-bird-what-does-the-data-say

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s